Out of Morocco

first_imgTasteless, ornate, over-the-top interiors are passe. There finally seems to be a solution to same-look interiors and the garish home accessories, unimaginatively stacked together. Case in point: this home in Jaipur by interior designer Shantanu Garg that defies all rules and dares to experiment with new themes. The ‘fusion’ trend,Tasteless, ornate, over-the-top interiors are passe. There finally seems to be a solution to same-look interiors and the garish home accessories, unimaginatively stacked together. Case in point: this home in Jaipur by interior designer Shantanu Garg that defies all rules and dares to experiment with new themes. The ‘fusion’ trend has been used and abused by architects and interior designers across the sub-continent. So, you can imagine the weight on Garg’s shoulders, when Dr Nalin Joshi, renowned pulmonologist from Jaipur, wanted a ‘fusion’ theme for his home in the capital of Rajasthan. “We suggested transitional dcor, a perfect balance of modern and traditional.Morocco became the basis of designing the home, but is not the only concept in the project,” explains 28-year-old Garg, who has designed over 80 diverse projects across the country. A mushrooming trend in India, Moroccan decor takes its roots from Moorish architecture and ranges from royal arches to modern buildings. “Elements of this form, like large motifs, customised fabrics, doorways and archways have helped achieve a transition between Moroccan, Mughal and modern design,” says Garg. Spread across 12,000 square feet, the bungalow has four floors and is a visual delight.UNDERSTANDING THE LAYOUT”This house is structured in the form of volumes like cubes and cuboids. The foyer is incorporated in one of the links of these volumes, which leads to formal living on the left and family living and dining on the right,” says Garg. As you cross the foyer there is Dr Joshi’s consultation room on the left and towards the end of the foyer, a puja room. On the other side of the living and dining room is the master bedroom, followed by a dress toilet, a lift shaft and a kitchen. “Climbing up the stairwell, we land into the lounge area that leads to two spaces-one block for the master suite, which is over the ground floor master bedroom and kitchen, while the other block is for the daughters, with two separate bedrooms and their personal dresser and toilets,” adds Garg. On the second floor, there is a home theatre, a guest bedroom and a gym, which opens into the terrace. The basement consists of extra storage and cellars, grain grinding machines and deep freezers.advertisementMOROCCAN MOTIFS AND COLOURSThe beauty of this home lies is the fact that each room has a distinctly different look. “The foyer is based on the concept of ‘compress and release’. It is initially is a narrow space, which releases into the larger living-cum-dining space,” adds Garg. The formal living room has been decorated with old collectibles and essays the Dr Joshi’s wife, Kalpana’s interest in jewellery and fabrics. “Using them for accessorising, the personal touch creates a warm feeling,” says the designer.The living room has a slit along the front glazing, cutting through the first floor, overlooking the beautifully landscaped lawns. A large but simple conical chandelier throws light with beautiful light-andshadow effect. “The kitchen is spacious, planned with an island counter in the centre, it has an attached store and a utility space with another access from outside for the help,” he adds. A small buffer space between the master bedroom and the living room affords privacy. The master bedroom showcases Moroccan motifs, on the wall and in the form of the furniture (like the TV unit and the bed’s headboard). “Bright colours are used only on the motifs on wall and on the headboard. Rest, everything is kept neutral in earthy tones,” he says.The bedroom is linear in plan with a French balcony open on three sides. “The back of the bed is designed with full height cushioning in Mughal painted fabric and modern panels with wall lights over the side tables,” explains the proud designer. The lounge on the first floor has a comfortable seating arrangement with an L-shaped sofa, ottoman and armchairs. A door in Moroccan style leads to the girls’ room. The elder daughter’s bedroom is designed keeping the informal cabana structure as the basis and the TV unit and study has a niche painted in a typical Moroccan pattern while the younger daughter’s bedroom has a bed inspired by a French chariot.The home theatre on the second floor consists of the wall panels cushioned with hand painted canvas fabric. The layout of the theatre is across two levels, one with recliners and the other with two beds perfect for an informal party space.MATERIALS COMPLEMENT DESIGNGarg has used Italian marble for the flooring in common spaces to increase the volume of the area, while wooden flooring has been used in the bedrooms to lend a feeling of warmth. The terrace sports Moroccan tiles, this ties the outside to the inside. “For the exterior surfaces, we have used a thin Italian tile from a company called Laminam, while the walls are adorned with a paint finish called Marmarino, which has the crust of stone mixed in it to give the grainy texture,” says Garg.advertisementThe furniture has been designed with Rubio coating, antique patina and metallic finishes. As for the soft furnishings, a mix of leather, and fabrics with custom prints have been used. It took Garg nine months to complete this property, as it required a lot of unique elements, which was a big challenge. “Take for instance the three sided column-and-wall free balcony with the master bedroom or the cantilevered home theatre, it was tough but the end result was worth the turmoil, sweat and stress,” he adds. Clearly, this home shows how three design genres (Moroccan, Mugal and modern) can coexist in style.last_img